Occupational therapy assistants help increase quality of life

Occupational therapy assistants help increase quality of life

Occupational therapy assistants help increase quality of life

For most, getting dressed or making breakfast are normal, everyday responsibilities.
However, common tasks such as these are considered major successes for certified occupational therapy assistants and their patients.


Certified occupational therapy assistants (COTAs) are part of a team that works with a varied population of patients who have suffered injury, illness or lost some function through the aging process.


"COTAs work under the guidance of a registered occupational therapist, who completes an initial evaluation making a complete assessment to the patients individual needs and determines a plan of care that the COTA carries out through various means of functional tasks, such as working through difficulties with home care, meal preparation, self care, etc., and ensuring that the patient is safe in his or her environment to complete these tasks," said Donna M. Rodriguez, a certified occupational therapy assistant at DM Rodriguez Home Therapy.


"COTAs also teach compensatory techniques and the use of assistive or adaptive devices to compensate for functions the patient is no longer able to complete as they were prior to their injury or illness. Their role is to help the individual regain or maintain as much independence as possible." 

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Can physical therapy help skin conditions?

Can physical therapy help skin conditions?

Can physical therapy help skin conditions?

Scleroderma is a clinical condition that is characterized by changes in blood vessels, skin, muscles, and cartilage due to a formation of antibodies that fight against one’s own body (an auto-immune disease).

This is classified as a ‘connective tissue disorder’ that is most prevalent in female individuals between the ages of 30 to 50. The precise cause of scleroderma has not yet been identified. However, a few treatment modalities are available. Physical therapy offers useful treatments that can offset the effects of scleroderma.

Why physical therapy?

Individuals with scleroderma experience tight skin and reduced joint movements. This results in intense discomfort and pain over a period of time. Physical therapy can help maintain skin laxity and a full range of joint motion with a variety of treatment options.

Basic Protection: It is advisable for every patient to ensure personal safety by wearing gloves and protective gear when performing any form of physical activity, including doing the dishes. Heat packs can be used to provide relief from pain and discomfort, but ensure that they are just warm and not too hot.

Stretching: Stretching is very beneficial to those suffering from scleroderma. Tightening of the skin and joints in the hands can reduce grip strength due to lack of use of hand muscles. Constant, gentle stretching of these structures helps maintain muscle tone and strength. When performed slowly and gently, as advised by the physical therapist, stretching can keep skin texture and tone normal, while keeping joint movements adequate.

Exercise Therapy: This does not refer to cardiovascular activity, but more so to the range of movement of the joints. It is recommended that patients perform these exercises after a warm shower or an application of heat, as the joints are a lot more supple when warmed. Physical therapists will advise patients what works best.

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Red Pant Team Spirit Award

Please help me in congratulating Michelle Gungler on receiving the first ever “Red Pant Team Spirit Award”.

 

This award is for the person who exemplifies the following – Respect – Compassion – Positivity – Innovation and Collaboration.

 

I also asked the team to send me one word to describe her:

Caring

Friendly

Grace Under Pressure

Determined

Focused

 

Thank you Michelle for bringing all these great qualities to our team!

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Health experts have figured out how much time you should sit each day

Health experts have figured out how much time you should sit each day

You may want to stand up while you read this -- and a lot of other stuff.

Experts now say you should start standing up at work for at least two hours a day -- and work your way toward four.

That's a long-awaited answer for a growing number of workers who may have heard of the terrible...

** Your Work Ethic **

** Your Work Ethic **

“I’m not afraid to die on a treadmill. I will not be outworked. You may be more talented than me. You might be smarter than me. And you may be better looking than me. But if we get on a treadmill together you are going to get off first or I’m going to die. It’s really that simple. I’m not going to be outworked.”

 

 

Remember – your GREATEST STRENGTH right now is your work ethic.  “Working hard” is measurable by one thing – your time in the market.  Prioritize that above all else, but manage your time and your priorities so other things don’t impede your growth and success.

 

 

Have an incredible day today!

New Law Lets School Staff Administer EpiPen Dosage

New Law Lets School Staff Administer EpiPen Dosage

About 1 in every 13 children has a food allergy, but many of them are unaware ... until they have a reaction. Governor Pat Quinn signed a new law Wednesday that makes it legal for a school official who isn't a nurse to administer drugs to quell an allergic episode.